We’re Simply Having a Wonderful Christmastide!

In December 1816, inventory records show that William Croghan purchased the following supplies for his household:
½ lb alspice
1 oz Thread
3 Pianno Strings
1 pair shoes
⅛ yds Levanture [Levantine?]
1 yd Riband
24 pains glass
4 pains glass
3 ¾ yds Blue Cloth
2 cuts Thread
2 doz Buttons
2 yds Linen
1 yd Flannel
1 lb Imperial Tea
2 Pitchers

His eldest son, Dr. John Croghan, is listed as ordering the following:
vest shape
1 ½ yds B. Cambric
2 skeins silk
1 doz moulds
paid Mrs Anderson for making vest shape
3 bowls
¼ lb Tea
1 qr. paper
½ yd Blk cambrick
½ qr. paper
2 yds Flannel
1 qr. paper
1 Loaf Sugar 8 Cherry
1 pair worsted
1 “ Lamb’s wool socks
½ quire Letter Paper
½ qr. common writing paper
½ qr. paper

Now, we have absolutely no evidence that any of this was going to be used in a holiday celebration like our own event, Christmastide. We don’t know if those two skeins of silk were a gift from John to one of his young sisters, or if William was planning on surprising Lucy with new glass windows. Three piano strings are certainly a part of regular piano maintenance and upkeep, and letter paper is a necessity when many of your friends and relations live miles away from Louisville.

What surprises do the gentlemen of the family have in store for the ladies?

It certainly is fun to imagine, however, that some of these purchases might turn into Christmas presents for the family’s end-of-year celebrations. In the early 19th century, Christmas looked a little different–Twelfth Night was the major seasonal holiday.  But a little after our interpretive time of 1816, many of the holiday traditions we know and love today came into being, such as “A Visit From St. Nicholas” (also known as “‘Twas the Night Before Christmas”),  first published on December 23, 1823 in the Troy Sentinel in New York State. Gift-giving had long been a part of holiday celebrations, but was generally not reciprocal and involved the master and mistress of a house or family bestowing tokens on their children, servants, slaves, and others without expecting anything in return. However, we at Locust Grove encourage everyone to give gifts–especially those that can be purchased at our Holiday Book Sale and Period Craft Market! If you’re looking for pitchers like the ones William purchased or a pair of lamb’s wool socks, look no further! Here are our participating historic artisans whose wares will be for sale during Christmastide:

In the Visitors’ Center you can also shop in our Museum Store, where everything is 20% off through Sunday, December 4! Children can also learn about the history of “A Visit from St. Nicholas” and make Christmas cards and pomander balls!

The ladies of the family will certainly have lots of tips for hosting a holiday party.

The ladies of the family will certainly have lots of tips for hosting a holiday party.

Once you venture out of the Visitors’ Center into the house, you’ll find members of the Croghan family and their friends engaged in all the bustle and activity of preparing for a holiday party. Perhaps you’ll encounter the ladies refreshing their curls while instructing younger members of the family on all the elements of being a good and gracious hostess. Maybe the gentlemen will deal you into a game of speculation or ask you which waistcoat is more appropriate for the occasion. There’s sure to be dancing and singing, as well as  conversations about all the events of the past year. No matter what time you arrive between 12pm and 7pm, you’re sure to find something to strike your historical fancy and draw you into the world of 1816. Christmastide festivities will run on Saturday, December 3, from 12-7pm. Admission is $6 for adults, $3 for children 6-12. Children under 6 will be free. Admission includes entrance to the Period Craft Market and the Holiday Book Sale. The Holiday Book Sale will continue on Sunday, December 4, from 10am-4:30pm with no admission charge.

Such silliness!

A lighthearted moment after last year’s Christmastide

We are so excited to welcome all of you back to Locust Grove this season! It is always a pleasure to have a cup of cheer with our friends and neighbors.

Warmly  yours,

Hannah

 

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