George on the Go

If you follow Locust Grove on Facebook, you may have noticed pictures of a familiar face floating around Louisville landmarks, accompanies by staff members and volunteers. Yes, folks, General George Rogers Clark (or at least his cardboard doppelganger) has taken to leaving Locust Grove once a month to stretch his legs, make some friends, and familiarize himself with the sights and sounds of the city he founded. George on the Go is a new Locust Grove program that takes a cardboard cut-out of GRC around Louisville and Southern Indiana with a threefold mission: to introduce George to Louisville, to heighten our staff and volunteer’s knowledge of other area cultural and historic sites, and to spread the word about all things Locust Grove. So far, we’ve had four outings and many more are in the works! George makes friends wherever he goes, so here are some pictures of his adventures!

For George’s September outing, he visited his old haunts and re-familiarized himself with Downtown Louisville.

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George hanging out with Meriwether Lewis and his brother William Clark at the Falls of the Ohio.

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George takes in the view of the river from the site of his cabin in Clarksville.

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George on the porch of his cabin in Clarksville.

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George with Locust Grove volunteers Hannah and Brandon.

 

George also enjoyed taking in all the sites along Main Street!

George took a tour of the Frazier Museum’s exhibit The Lewis and Clark Adventure to catch up with his brother’s exploits!

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George even saw a familiar face at the entrance to the exhibit!

In October, George and friends Jason, Noah, and Jocelyn Hiner took in the Kentucky Derby Museum and Churchill Downs, the Jane Austen Society of North America’s Annual Meeting, and the Big Four Bridge!

George’s great-nephew, Meriwether Lewis Clark, Jr. founded Churchill Downs and started the Kentucky Derby in 1875!

Catching up with friends at the Jane Austen Society of North America’s Annual Meeting at the Galt House!

George also had a blast walking to Indiana on the Big Four Bridge!

 

In November, George stopped by the Zachary Taylor National Cemetery to pay his respects to President Taylor and his fellow veterans, accompanied by volunteer Jeannie Vezeau, and his sister Ann Clark Gwathmey and her husband, Owen Gwathmey.

The General’s most recent outing was to the opening of the New Lincoln Bridge, connecting Louisville to Jeffersonville, IN. George was very gratified to meet outgoing Kentucky Lieutenant Governor Crit Luallen and several Abraham Lincolns!

Miniature Georges have also been taken on trips to Japan, Disney World, Florida, and the Cayman Islands in 2015!

Volunteers, staff members, members, and friends of Locust Grove are always welcome to join George as he goes out and about the city of Louisville!  In fact, I need your help deciding where George should visit in January! Our outing is scheduled for January 23 at 10am, and we would love to have you join us! Please take a minute to check out the poll below and cast your vote!

Thanks for all your support of George’s adventures–we’re looking forward to even more in 2016!

Intrepidly yours,

Hannah

P.S. Catch more pictures of George below! And follow along on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram using the hashtag #GeorgeontheGo!

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We’re going to Kentucky, we’re going to the Fair: A Weekend at Locust Grove’s Market Fair

Fall is one of the best times of year to visit Locust Grove, so what better way to see the house and grounds than during the lively festivities of Market Fair! This year’s event was a tremendous success, full of wonderful performances, engaging demonstrations, dozens of vendors of all sorts of foods and goods, and of course, the faces of our friends who came out to the fair! Here are some of the highlights from the weekend.

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My favorite part of Market Fair is seeing the site come alive with the stories from the past and the people in the present who interpret those stories. It’s especially fun when Locust Grove plays host to animals! Spinner and Weaver Peggy from Loom Hall borrowed three sheep and brought them with her! I spent a lot of my weekend making friends with Juniper, Llama, and Cotton.

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Good morning sheep!

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An animated discussion about wool.

Wool at Loom Hall.

Wool at Loom Hall.

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Peggy was happy to talk wool, sheep, spinning, and looms to visitors.

Another new addition to Market Fair was an 18th century pony cart! Candy trotted Mattie the pony around the fair, cheering everyone up with the sound of the cart’s bells!

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Candy and Mattie pause during artillery demonstrations.

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Spot Candy and Mattie in this picture!

Crown Point Bread Company joined us again from New York, and brought along Carver, the resident bread dog. However, Carver was more interested in the wares of His Lordship’s Beef than bread and made every effort to befriend Steve and his team throughout the weekend.

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“Come on Steve, just one tiny taste?”

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Meat roasts at His Lordship’s Beef

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Carver’s human, Yannig, sold delicious rolls, loaves, and cookies, and always had long lines.

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The crew of His Lordship’s Beef!

For many people, Market Fair is a kind of family reunion, a time to spend time with friends and fellow reenactors from all over the country. Blacksmith Aubrey Williams came from Terre Haute, Indiana for the weekend, and shared a booth with Jim Carr, from the Hikes Point neighborhood of Louisville. Williams has been coming to Market Fair for about ten years, and enjoys demonstrating his forge to visitors, remarking that “people like you to make things.” Carr works in IT when not in the forge and got hooked on reliving history after visiting Market Fair a few years ago.

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Jim and Aubrey are truly talented smiths.

Silas Moore the Rat Catcher brought his apprentice (and grandson) Roscoe to Market Fair this year.

Silas Moore the Rat Catcher brought his apprentice (and grandson) Roscoe to Market Fair this year.

By day, Nathanael Logsdon is the director of Historic Tunnel Mill, and the proprietor of Taylor Rose Historical Outfitters. During Market Fair, he brewed my favorite beverage, coffee, along with tea and chocolate, as Hellringer and Kurtz. (The Kentucky Bourbon Pecan blend was delicious!)

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Nathanael was joined by his family and a giant copper coffee pot!

I also met a group of folks with another connection to George Rogers Clark–Barbara Lemmons and Gary, Liz, and Kyra Williams from Evansville, Indiana. Their home historic site is George Rogers Clark National Historical Park in Vincennes, and they enjoy coming down to Louisville to further celebrate the past and George Rogers Clark. As Gary, a graphic designer, said “George Rogers Clark was a very real person”, and learning more about him and other like him is one of the best part of reenacting. Kyra has been a reenactor her whole life–24 years, one month, and three weeks as of Market Fair!–and along with her mom, Liz, counts the shopping and the people as her favorite part of the event. My favorite part? Barbara’s ginger cookies.

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Gary, Kyra, Barbara, and Liz are Market Fair veterans!

Joining us once again all the way from Wisconsin were the Amazing Budabi Brother, Nick and Erik. According to Erik, they grew up as Amish gypsies, and were raised as ninjas. Put differently by Nick, they were born into reenacting and trained horses and oxen until they learned to juggle as teenagers to help them get girls. They quickly learned that jokes and fire make for a better show, and audiences seem to agree! What should we expect from the Budabis at next year’s Market Fair? “Elephants.”

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Erik often gets called Aladdin. Someone once told Nick he looked like the Hamburglar.

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We also had some wonderful musical performances by Jonathan Hagee the balladeer and Jack Salt and the Captain’s Daughter! You can go to our YouTube channel and check out some song snippets from these talented performers.

Market Fair wasn’t always pleasant, however. Some Patriot gentlemen began declaiming anti-British sentiments and reading aloud from Thomas Paine’s Common Sense, and brought out a dummy of the King. Two Loyalist gentlemen overheard, and the next thing anyone knew, the Regulars were on the move, and the Patriots were on the run.

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Mr. Paine has some interesting ideas.

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However, this Loyalist gentleman didn’t seem to appreciate them.

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Searching for those radical gentlemen.

Market Fair wouldn’t be complete without reenacting a few military drills and engagements.

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So, for one weekend, this old house rang with the sounds of forges and pony cart bells, cannon fire, sea chanteys, and good friends meeting old friends. What a lovely end to October–we can’t wait until next year! We love knowing what you thought of your historical experiences, so please share your stories and pictures with us, here on the blog in the comments section, or on Facebook. We certainly hope to see you again soon–for Christmastide! Thank you for spending time with us this autumn!

With sincere good wishes,

Hannah

 

 

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P.S. Check out even more photos from Market Fair below!

Additional photographs provided by Jeannie Vezeau, Gail Thompson, and Bob Boone. 

To Market, to Market: It’s Time for the 18th Century Market Fair!

Come one, come all, to Market Fair! This weekend, October 24-25, Locust Grove will come alive with the sounds of chatting and bargaining, the smells of woodsmoke and gunpowder, and all the sights you would expect from a Market Fair set in the 1780s. Visitors will be able to converse with men, women, and children about life during the final years of the War for Independence, tour the house, view mock battles and perhaps join in a militia drill or two, learn songs and games from the period, and of course, shop at all the booths and tents that will spring up on the grounds! Over 25 vendors will be selling their period wares, from pottery to spoons to bread to bonnets. And once again, our property is divided between the Americans and the British, so be sure to take a tour of both camps to see and hear both sides of the story.

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Market Fairs seem special to us, but they were commonplace in Colonial America. Markets held in town squares or other designated marketplaces allowed far-flung members of the community to come into nascent towns to buy, sell, and trade goods and gossip. In fact, in 1706, the General Assembly of Virginia passed “An act for establishing ports and towns”, and in this act, designated that these towns would have a market twice a week and a fair at least once a year. Later acts gave the governor the power to establish markets, and market days became a time for court sessions, auctions, militia drills, all sorts of entertainments, and much more. Markets helped communities to grow and towns to be more firmly established, with permanent stores and other trappings of civilization.

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Here at Locust Grove, we treat our Market Fair in much the same way. Our community has grown a great deal since the founding of Louisville in 1778, and we enjoy this time to catch up with our neighbors and friends. We also like the chance to check in on the 18th century, and immerse ourselves in the daily activities on the friends who have gone before us. Like Market Fairs of old, we have something for everyone, from the antics of the Amazing Budabi Brothers and the sea chanteys of Jack Salt and the Captain’s Daughter to the wares of Crown Pointe Bread Company, Bee Tree Pottery, and Flying Heart Millinery to simply spending time on the 55 beautiful acres that make up Locust Grove today. Market Fair is a rain or shine event, and there is plenty to do under cover even if we have some showers! We certainly hope you’ll be one of the friendly faces to join in the fun!

The full schedule for both days  is printed below, and you can check out the weekend’s proceedings by following us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.  You can also use the hashtag #GRCMarketFair to share your pictures and stories of the day! Please look for me, your cheerful neighborhood blogger, during your visit–I’ll be the one trying to take pictures of everyone with our cardboard cutout of George Rogers Clark! I’d certainly love to see you!

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Schedule of Events for the
18th Century Market Fair

Schedule for Saturday, October 24th

10:30-10:50 Morning Parade of the Military

11:00-11:30   Artillery Demonstration

11:30-12:00 Military Fashion Show (Auditorium)

11:30-12:00 Flax demonstration

12:30-1:00   Jack Salt & the Captain’s Daughter musical performance

12:30-1:00   Tour of the Military Camps: meet at the log cabin by the stone wall for the American Camp; meet at wood shop for the British Camp

12:30- 1:00 Riot in the Market

1:00-2:00   Undressing the Historical Lady with Maggie Waterman (Auditorium)

1:00-2:00 Jon Hagee, 18th Century Balladeer (Porch of the Historic Home)

1:00-1:30     Tour of the Military Camp: meet at the log cabin by the stone wall for the American Camp; meet at wood shop for the British Camp

1:30-2:00     Tour of the Military Camp: meet at the log cabin by the stone wall for the American Camp; meet at wood shop for the British Camp

1:30-2:00    Jack Salt & the Captain’s Daughter musical performance

2:00-2:45     Military Recruitment

3:00-3:45     Battle between Colonial and British Forces in the field

4:15-4:30     Military Retreat

Victuals:

His Lordship’s Beef –Caterers of Fine Victuals

Crown Pointe Bread Co. – Artisanal cheese, bread and baked goods

Hellringer and Kurtz Kaffee Haus– Coffee, Hot Tea, Hot Chocolate, and Hot Mulled Cider

Locust Grove Food Shop – Familiar Food and Hot Beverages

Other Entertainment on the Grounds:

The Amazing Budabi Brothers – Jugglers Extraordinaire!

Lisette LeFoux– Learn your fortune from the tarot card reader

The Rat Catcher– Ensuring the grounds are free of rodents

Jack Salt – Traditional sea songs and chanteys
The Doctor Is In – Visit an 18th Century doctor in the Residence

Maggie Delaney– Indentured servant

Doug Roush– 18th Century Penman and Handwriting Expert

Colonial Balladeer – 18th Century Ballads & Pub Songs

18th Century Pony Cart

Schedule for Sunday, October 25th

11:00-11:20     Morning Parade of the Military

11:30-12:00   Jack Salt & the Captain’s Daughter musical performance

11:30-12:00 Military Fashion Show (Auditorium)

12:00-12:30  Artillery Demonstration

12:30-1:30 Jon Hagee, 18th Century Balladeer (Porch of the Historic Home)

12:30-1:00     Tour of the Military Camp: meet at the log cabin by the stone wall for the American Camp;  meet at wood shop for the British Camp

1:00-1:30     Undressing the Historical Lady with Maggie Waterman (Auditorium)

1:00-1:30     Tour of the Military Camp: meet at the log cabin by the stone wall for the American Camp;meet at wood shop for the British Camp

1:00-1:30 Riot in the Market

1:30-2:00     Tour of the Military Camp: meet at the log cabin by the stone wall for the American Camp;  meet at wood shop for the British Camp

1:30-2:00   Jack Salt & the Captain’s Daughter musical performance

1:30-2:30   Military Recruitment

2:00-3:00 Music by the Drewry Family, Don and Esther Drewry: 18th Century

Instrumental Music (Porch of the Historic Home)

3:00-3:45 Battle between Colonial and British Forces in the field

3:45-4:00   Military Retreat

Victuals:

His Lordship’s Beef – Caterers of Fine Victuals

Crown Pointe Bread Co. – Artisanal cheese, bread and baked goods
Hellringer and Kurtz Kaffee Haus- Coffee, Hot Tea, Hot Chocolate, and Hot Mulled Cider

Locust Grove Food Shop – Familiar Food and Hot Beverages

Other Entertainment on the Grounds:

The Amazing Budabi Brothers – Jugglers Extraordinaire!

Lisette LeFoux– Learn your fortune from the tarot card reader

The Rat Catcher– Ensuring the grounds are free of rodents

Jack Salt – Traditional sea songs and chanteys
The Doctor Is In – Visit an 18th Century doctor in the Residence

Maggie Delaney– Indentured servant

Doug Roush– 18th Century Penman and Handwriting Expert

Colonial Balladeer – 18th Century Ballads & Pub Songs

18th Century Pony Cart

Oh, what fun we’ll have!

Yours, with a Huzzah!

Hannah

P.S. To receive updates on all the goings-on at Locust Grove, why not join our e-mailing list? Sign-up HERE to receive monthly updates! Or if you foresee numerous visits to Locust Grove in your future, why not become a member? Friends of Locust Grove receive free admission, invitations to members-only events, a 10% discount in the Museum Store, a copy of our quarterly newsletter, The Grove Gazette and much, much more! More information can be found HERE.You can also follow Locust Grove on the web by subscribing to the blog on the right!

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